Knitting and Crocheting Hats for Cancer Patients: Tips and Free Patterns!

Welcome to a new crafting era! That's right: Knitting and crocheting are totally "in" now. With the world at our fingertips via Pinterest, Craftster, and Ravelry, people of all ages are starting to embrace their inner crafter by taking up these needle crafts. One incredible trend that has come out of this boost in needlework is the 'Creating for Greater Good' attitude. For instance, try Googling ‘Crochet or Knit Cancer Hat Patterns’. Crafty crafters make these hats to provide those going through chemo with comfort, warmth, and a boost of self esteem. Just think: Your crafting could go towards making someone’s day just a little bit brighter. Still not convinced?

 

Why You Should Learn to Knit or Crochet

 

  1. Handmade Goodies are the Best Goodies

As cliche as it may sound, hand stitched gifts are made with love. You dedicated your time and effort to make these items with someone in mind. What more tangible way is there to show someone you care?

  1. Knitting and Crocheting Relieves Stress

Crocheting and knitting are extremely therapeutic. Think about it: You're counting stitches in a quiet environment while watching your project come together right in front of you. Feels good, man!

  1. Binge Watching Guilt? Not When You're Crocheting or Knitting!

You're being productive! Don't feel bad about watching seasons 2-4 of The Office in one sitting if you're making hats aplenty.

 


 

Tips of the Trade

To help get you started, we have a few tips for you:

  • Here's a big secret: You should definitely NOT always choose the prettiest, sparkliest yarn. These can unfortunately be very scratchy and hard to wear for long periods of time. When choosing the perfect yarn, keep in mind who you’re crafting for: Many people going through chemo experience sensitivity of the scalp so the yarn must be soft and have a little stretch to it (chemo can also cause a bit of head swelling). We suggest checking out this fantastic list of yarn from Knots of Love.

 

  • Make sure the project you choose is not super textured as this can cause added discomfort to your recipient.

 

  • Let's be real: Everyone hits a roadblock when it comes to a new knit/crochet project every now and then, even the most tenured of crafters. Consider searching YouTube for how-to videos on how to get started or certain stitches.

 

  • If you turn into a hat-making machine but have no one in mind to craft for, you can always send your finished goods to Knots of Love (be sure you meet their requirements before sending them any hats).

 


 

The Goods (i.e. The Patterns)

Here we are: the meat of the post. We have compiled a list of a few simple crochet or knitted projects simple enough for beginners or quick projects for more advanced knit/crochet tycoons.

 

Crochet Chemo Hat Patterns

Crochet hat patterns for cancer patients

Click here for Peacock and Dove Hat Crochet Patterns (pictured above).

 

Knitting Chemo Hat Patterns

Hat knitting patterns for cancer patients.

Click here for Mainah Hat knitting pattern (pictured left).

Click here for Basic Magic Loop Hat pattern (pictured right).

 


 

When it comes down to it, knitting and crocheting are beneficial to both you and the person you are gifting—even if you are gifting to yourself. Want to gift someone a beautiful knit or crochet hat but don't have time to make one? Send them one of ours! 

Crochet hat patterns for cancer patients

Left to Right: Prismatic Hand Crocheted Hat, Hand Crocheted Cotton Flower Hat PinsHand Crocheted Cotton Kathleen Hat

 

Hat knitting patterns for cancer patients

Left to right: Avery Slouchy Cap; Stephanie Cap; Cuffed Slouchy Cap

 

Suggested Posts:

How Woodblock Scarves are Made

What's the Difference Between Bamboo and Cotton?

Why We Love Adult Coloring

Cancer Hats: Buying Guide

One thought on “Knitting and Crocheting Hats for Cancer Patients: Tips and Free Patterns!”

  • Marian

    I would like to donate hats that I've crocheted. When I have a few extra dollars I buy yarn. Is this only for knitting? My husband has bladder cancer. He is recovering from a stroke.

    Thank you,
    Marian Ten Cate

    Reply
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